How to Talk to Your Child About Online Porn

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How to Talk To Your Child About Online Porn
How to Talk To Your Child About Online Porn

Editors Note: The California Partners Project conducted a statewide listening tour with California mothers, parents, and caregivers to understand how they navigated the integration of technology and devices into most aspects of their children’s lives. These evolving toolkits and best practices are meant to meet parents where they are.How to Talk with Your Child about Online Porn is the twelfth toolkit.

Sexually explicit material, including pornography, is pervasive online. The average age children typically see porn online, whether purposely or inadvertently, is 11 or 12, and approximately 70% of young people report seeing online porn. This means waiting to speak to your children until they are teenagers may miss the chance to have these important, if uncomfortable, conversations before they are exposed to sexually explicit media and age-inappropriate images and videos.

Tips from Shafia Zaloom, health educator
and author of Sex, Teens & Everything in Between

Tip 1:  Prepare yourself ahead of time for the conversation to maintain your composure. 

Let your child know that pornography is not representative of most people’s sexual reality or healthy sexuality practices. It’s not for educational purposes, but for the entertainment of some adults. If your child has seen sexually explicit material, ask if they have questions about what they have seen. Be straightforward with your answers and focus on how your child may be feeling by asking, “what feelings came up for you?” instead of talking explicitly about the porn itself. 

Tip 2:  Make space for conversations in the future.

Parents could say to a child, “if you see something online that seems inappropriate or makes you upset, please tell me or a trusted adult. You may come across something online that you didn’t mean to find.” Help a child understand it is not their fault. 

Tip 3:   Acknowledge it is normal to be curious. 

Many kids are understandably curious about sex and may look to porn as a resource to learn more about it. A parent may prefer to set the tone that you can be the “askable” parent so that your children feel comfortable asking you questions about sexuality. Provide alternative resources through medically accurate and credible books and websites. Scaffold conversations about sex and porn over time depending on the age of the child. Validate your child’s curiosity and make sure to speak in ways that don’t create shame. 

Tip 4:  Provide youth the tools to say no to a classmate who may try to show them explicit material. 

Guide your child through a potentially uncomfortable situation by suggesting language to respond, “I’m not into that right now. Let’s get back to what we were doing.” 

Resources

https://www.shafiazaloom.com/
https://www.commonsensemedia.org/lists/shafia-zalooms-picks-sex-ed-books-for-kids
https://amaze.org/what-is-amaze/

As California mother’s, we are bringing these toolkits to you through a cross-collaborative campaign. San Francisco Bay Area Moms is proud to be working with Ventura County Mom Collective and Inland Empire Mom Collective. We too, want to “ensure our state’s media and technology industries are a force for good in child development” (part of California Partners Project Mission Statement). #TechTips4CaliMoms

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Tracy is a Lead Instructor for Darkness to Light, a child sexual abuse prevention organization and serves as a College and Career Advisor for Students Rising Above. She grew up in northeast Ohio, and has lived in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Arizona, and Northern Virginia and has worked in the arts, in education, in non-profits and in ed tech. Her husband's job brought them to the Bay Area and there's no looking back! Tracy is mom to a 17-year-old daughter and 14-year-old son. Self-care includes pedicures, reading, cooking, crafting, and just being with her family. She also serves on the Citizen's Bond Oversight Committee for the Dublin School District and on the Advisory Council for the Transformative Leadership in Disruptive Times Certificate Program at Cal State East Bay.

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